Summer Semester in the Yukon

Summer Semester in the Yukon

Highlights

  • 28 days backpacking, 20 days whitewater canoeing, and 9 days independent student travel
  • Mostly off-trail hiking and mountain travel in the vast and remote Yukon Territory
  • Whitewater canoeing on class I-III rapids
  • Explore Canada's Subarctic, some of North America's most remote wilderness
  • Lots of wildlife viewing opportunities
An action-packed learning adventure, this semester begins and ends in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Canada, and it takes place entirely in Canada's subarctic, where remote, wild land stands unparalleled. For 57 days your expedition will explore the wilds of the Yukon with a backpack and canoe seeing few people along the way.

In fact, with a ratio of six caribou and one moose to every Yukon resident, you're more likely to share this vast wilderness with animals than with humans. Along your route, you will fish, cross unnamed rivers, summit unnamed peaks, and explore the same areas as turn-of-the-century gold seekers.

After this semester, you'll be a comfortable traveler in the backcountry with unmatched technical expeditionary skills in backpacking and whitewater canoeing.

Details

Location NOLS Yukon
Tuition $9,775 Learn about Financial Aid
Equipment Deposit $750
Minimum Age 17
Duration 57 Days
Type Semester
Start/End Whitehorse, Yukon
Fly in/out Whitehorse, Yukon
College Credit
(Optional)
  • 11 Credit Hours
  • 2 Hours Biology
  • 2 Hours Environmental Studies
  • 3 Hours Leadership Techniques
  • 2 Hours Skills Practicum
  • 2 Hours Risk Assessment
Learn about College Credit
High School Credit
(Optional)
  • 2 Carnegie Units
  • 1 CU Physical Education
  • 1 CU Leadership
Learn about High School Credit
Downloads

“The most rewarding thing about this course was the student led independent travel. It was satisfying to know that all we had learned throughout the course built up to this experience. Traveling and camping alone with my peers who I trusted with my life is an experience I will never forget.”

-Clark W.

NOLS Grad